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Salween Watch
Thailand worries over Wa dam project PDF Print E-mail
Wednesday, 06 February 2013 00:00

S.H.A.N.

Reports of the United Wa State Army (UWSA)’s preparations to build a dam over the Kok that flows from Burma’s Shan State into Thailand and drains into the Mekong has stirred up concern among Thai communities in Chiangmai and Chiangrai, according to sources from the Thai-Burmese border.

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Chinese Environmentalists Lose Fight to Stop Nu River Dams PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 05 February 2013 00:00

Time Magazine

Workers fix a floating platform used for the construction of a dam on the Nu River, also known as the Salween River, in China's southwestern Yunnan province on March 1, 2007

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Hydro dams could jeopardise 'Grand Canyon of the east', say green groups PDF Print E-mail

The guardian

Dams on China's last free-flowing river could harm ecosystems, displace people, and cause catastrophic seismic events 

Jonathan Kaiman in Beijing
guardian.co.uk, Tuesday 29 January 2013 10.37 GMT   

Chinese environmental groups warn that government plans for a slew of hydroelectric dams on the pristine Salween (Nu) river – often called the Grand Canyon of the east for its deep valleys and sweeping views – could jeopardise biodiverse ecosystems and indigenous cultures, and lead to potentially catastrophic seismic events.

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Two hydropower projects proposed in Shan State PDF Print E-mail
Thursday, 13 December 2012 00:00

Eleven Media Group

A local company recently made an investment proposal for two hydropower projects in Shan State, eastern Myanmar, according to the Directorate of Investment and Company Administration.

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Burma Seeks to Dam Another River PDF Print E-mail

Asian Sentinel
Written by Charlie Campbell, The Irrawaddy  
Wednesday, 04 July 2012

Having lost the Myitsone dam on the Irrawaddy, developers turn to the Salween

Snaking through the verdant limestone landscape, the Salween River finally reaches the Andaman Sea by Burma’s former teak port capital of Moulmein after running a course of 2,800 kilometers during which it supports an estimated 10 million people.

But times are changing for what was once the longest free-flowing river in Asia, as Chinese, Thai and Burmese-backed dam projects look set to transform the dynamic of this vital waterway in the wake of Naypyidaw’s peace deals with ethnic armed groups.

Pianporn Deetes, of the International Rivers environmental NGO, told The Irrawaddy that Karen State Chief Minister Zaw Min just confirmed to her group that the southernmost Hatgyi Dam—one of seven on the cards on Burma’s stretch of the river—has finally been approved by the government.

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Salween River Dammed by Peace PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 03 July 2012 00:00

The Irrawaddy

 PA-AN, Karen State — Snaking through the verdant limestone landscape, the Salween River finally reaches the Andaman Sea by Burma’s former teak port capital of Moulmein after running a course of 2,800 kilometers during which it supports an estimated 10 million people.

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Villagers register concerns about proposed Hatgyi Dam PDF Print E-mail
Tuesday, 26 June 2012 00:00

KHRG

Photo Set: Villagers register concerns about proposed Hatgyi Dam
Download report as PDF [Adobe Acrobat PDF616 kb]

This Photo Set includes 28 photos taken in two villages in the southern area of Bu Tho Township in Papun District, and in three villages in the northern area of Lu Pleh Township in Pa'an District, all of which are located in the Salween river valley near the site where the Hatgyi dam will be constructed. These photographs depict villagers throughout these townships pursuing their livelihoods and children attending school. According to the community member who spoke with villagers in the area and took these photos, as well as local media,[1] the villagers will be displaced by flooding near the dam site if construction at Hatgyi goes ahead as planned. This Photo Set also includes evidence of an earlier meeting in Myaing Gyi Ngu regarding intended forced relocation of villages in the proposed Hatgyi dam site prior to flooding. The photos depict a pamphlet on the dam, as well as solar panels, LED lights and batteries that were given to villagers in the areas that will be affected. In order to pre-empt forcible relocation or flooding, some villagers in the area have chosen to close schools in preparation for moving.

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Mekong Dam Halt ‘Shows Way for Burma’ on Salween PDF Print E-mail
Saturday, 12 May 2012 00:00
The Irrawaddy

In a move which could have political and economic significance for Burma, the Mekong River Commission has ordered that all work on a major hydroelectric dam in Laos must be suspended pending new environmental studies.
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Salween Hydrodam Back on Development Menu? PDF Print E-mail
Saturday, 31 March 2012 00:00
The Irrawaddy

Chinese surveyors are reported to be working again at the site of what would be the big hydroelectric dam and reservoir in Burma, on the River Salween near the border with Thailand.
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Dam builders, listen to the people PDF Print E-mail
Liu Jianqiang, China Dialogue
March 16, 2012

On March 14, in the Karen minority village of Sab Moei in Northern Thailand, hundreds of villagers gathered on the riverbank and split into three groups, according to their religion, to pray for the Salween River.  There are three religions practised locally: animism, Buddhism, and Christianity.  Yet the villagers all express the same worry:  “A dam is to be built on our Mother River; this is akin to strangling us to death.”
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